Player of the day: Tim Howard, the record breaking number of saves in 1 match

Copyright -‏@BudweiserFC via Twitter
USA goalkeeper Tim Howard made an incredible 16 saves during the game between USA vs Belgium in the knockout stage of the World Cup, breaking the record for the most number of saves in a single World Cup match.

  Despite the USA’s eventual 2-1 loss to Belgium in extra time, Tim Howard put in a world-class performance that frustrated Belgium who were unable to find a way to score in the regular 90 minutes, and had to go extra time to make it to Howard's net. Tim Howard was also the man of the match for this game, well deserved!!!



Social networks went crazy after the keeper's performance, we've selected some tweets for for the occasion.


 





 



 



 



 





 

Magufuli tasks Tanzania football team to win AFCON 2019

President John Pombe Magufuli, who hosted the victorious Taifa Stars to a luncheon, urged the team to do even better in June, when they take on the finest teams from the continent in Egypt.

Tanzania’s national team players were on Monday rewarded with plots of land after they defeated the Uganda Cranes on Sunday (3-0) to qualify for the African Cup of Nations (AFCON 2019).

President John Pombe Magufuli, who hosted the victorious Taifa Stars to a luncheon, urged the team to do even better in June, when they take on the finest teams from the continent in Egypt.

‘‘I believe our players can put up a better show in Cairo, and go one place better by winning the title,’‘ Magufuli said.

‘‘For the good work you have done to bring honour to Tanzania by qualifying fir Afcon finals in Egypt, each player will get a parcel of land in Dodoma.’‘

READ MORE: AFCON 2019 at a glance

Joy for Tanzanians

Tanzanians were particularly happy with the local Citizen newspaper described as ‘disciplined, skillful and entertaining display’ against Uganda on Sunday.

Uganda, which had already qualified from the group ahead of the Tanzania clash, had been warned by its president Yoweri Museveni, not to lose against the Taifa Stars.

Tanzania’s qualification to the showpiece in Egypt is the first time for the team in 39 years.

Here's how AFCON 2019 is shaping up

Burundi on Saturday joined Madagascar and Mauritania as countries going to the finals (AFCON 2019) for the first time.

The expanded African Cup of Nations that will feature 24 teams for the first time, take place in June/July rather than the traditional January window and will have three teams taking part for the first time ever.

Burundi on Saturday joined Madagascar and Mauritania as countries going to the finals (AFCON 2019) for the first time.

Burundi’s qualification earned through a 1-1 draw against Gabon, also means the East Africa bloc will have four countries at Africa’s premier football tournament. Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya also qualified for AFCON 2019.

South Africa booked the last place at the African Cup of Nations finals with a 2-1 away win over Libya thanks to Percy Tau’s double on Sunday.

Participants

The 24 countries that will play at the AFCON finals are: Egypt (hosts), Algeria, Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, Tunisia, Uganda, Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Benin and South Africa.

  • CAF in July 2017 decided to expand the tournament from 16 teams to 24, as part of reforms to make the tournament more competitive.
  • Egypt secured hosting hosting rights for AFCON 2019 in January, after CAF said Cameroon was not ready, in terms of infrastructure and security.
  • AFCON 2019 will be held from 21 June to 19 July.
  • Draws for the group stages are scheduled to take place on 12 April.
  • Cameroon will be defending the title they won in January 2017 in Gabon.
ALSO READ: Egypt reassures CAF for AFCON 2019

AFCON 2019: South Africa, Zimbabwe, DRC, Tanzania and Benin qualify as campaign wraps up

Tanzania joins fellow East Africans Uganda, Burundi and Kenya at the finals in Cairo

South Africa became the 24th and last country to qualify for the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations after a 2-1 win over Libya in Sfax, Tunisia on Sunday. Along with Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania and Benin, the Bafana Bafana swept up the five remaining spots for the finals in Egypt on the last day of the qualifying campaign.

Zimbabwe edged the Republic of Congo 2-0 in Harare to top Group G while DR Congo beat Liberia 1-0 in Kinshasa to secure second spot.

President Felix Tshisekedi was among thousands of fans who cheered on the national team as they wrapped up a difficult qualifying campaign.

Tanzania beat Uganda in Dar es Salaam 3-0 to qualify as Group L runners up. Uganda had already qualified with a game to spare.

In Cotonou, Benin beat Togo 2-1 to qualify from Group D. North African giants Algeria led the group.

Earlier on Saturday, Burundians partied late into the night as they celebrated their country’s historic qualification to the Africa Cup of Nations.

Burundi drew 1-1 with Gabon in Bujumbura to finish second in Group C and secured a spot in the Nations Cup finals for the first time in their history. Mali topped the group.

Cedric Amissi scored in the 76th minute as Burundi, who only needed a draw to qualify, looked to have sealed their place at Egypt 2019.

Burundi joins fellow East Africans Uganda and Kenya at the finals in Cairo.

Gabon’s Arsenal striker Aubameyang had a largely quiet afternoon and they were unable to get the second goal they needed to reach the finals.

Also on Saturday, title holders Cameroon qualified after beating Comoros 3-0 in Yaounde. Guinea Bissau and Namibia also qualified.

The 24 countries that will play at the AFCON finals are: Egypt (hosts), Algeria, Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, Tunisia, Uganda, Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Benin and South Africa.

United Nations backs S. Africa's Semenya in case against IAAF

South African 800-metres double Olympic champion Semenya is seeking to overturn a new set of IAAF regulations that are aimed at lowering the testosterone levels of hyperandrogenic athletes.

United Nations backs Semenya

Semenya received support from the United Nations this week as they adopted a resolution tabled by South Africa “aimed at eliminating discrimination against women and girls in sport, giving significant global weight from a human rights perspective to Caster Semenya’s case”, according to a media release from the South African government.

The resolution was co-sponsored by Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland), Mozambique, Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Burundi, India, Iceland and Canada.

“The international campaign to preserve Caster’s right to participate in global sports is a struggle for all women in the world against discrimination, sexism, and patriarchy,” South Africa’s minister of international relations and cooperation, Lindiwe Sisulu, said.

CAS has called the hearing one of its most pivotal cases that could have a wide reaching consequence, not just for the future of athletics, but sport in general.

Semenya optimistic

Lawyers representing double Olympic 800-metres champion Caster Semenya said on Friday she is “optimistic” of success in her appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) over eligibility regulations in athletics for female classification.

“Caster Semenya remains optimistic that CAS will declare the IAAF’s Regulations unlawful, invalid and of no effect,” Semenya’s lawyers said in a statement on Friday, confirming at the same time that the athlete had made additional submissions to CAS following “post-hearing communications from the IAAF”.

They did not go into detail as to what those submissions were in relation to.

CAS postpones verdict

Five days before it was to deliver a verdict on the case between South Africa’s star athlete Caster Semenya and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) said on Thursday it would postpone its decision until the end of April.

South African 800-metres double Olympic champion Semenya is seeking to overturn a new set of IAAF regulations that are aimed at lowering the testosterone levels of hyperandrogenic athletes.

The IAAF contend that Semenya and other female athletes that are classed as having differences in sexual development (DSDs) gain an unfair advantage due to their higher testosterone levels, but only in races between 400 and 1,000-metres.

READ MORE: How the case between Semenya and IAAF unfolded

Under its new rules, athletes classed as having DSDs must reduce their blood testosterone level to below five (5) nmol/L for a continuous period of six months before they can compete. They must then maintain it below that level continuously.

A wide coalition has rallied behind Semenya’s cause, including the government in her native South Africa and rights activists worldwide.

Some scientific experts have argued that barring Semenya from competition due to naturally high testosterone levels would be like excluding basketball players because they are too tall.

CAS explains delay

CAS have called the hearing “one of the most pivotal CAS cases” that could have a wide reaching consequence not just for the future of athletics, but sport in general.

The body had been expected to announce its decision on March 26, six months prior to the World Championships in Doha.

It said on Thursday that since the Feb. 18-22 hearing, the parties have filed additional submissions and materials. No specific date for the decision has been set.

IAAF reacts to delay

The IAAF said that, given the delay, it would alter the six-month rule for the world championships in Qatar in September and introduce a “special transitional period” so that affected athletes could still compete.

“The IAAF has decided that the delay should not prejudice the affected athletes,” it said in a statement.

It added that, assuming its new regulations were upheld, affected athletes who comply with the new limit from one week after the final CAS decision until the start of the world championships in September would be allowed to take part.

Agencies

Sports court delays verdict on Semenya's case against IAAF

South African 800-metres double Olympic champion Semenya is seeking to overturn a new set of IAAF regulations that are aimed at lowering the testosterone levels of hyperandrogenic athletes.

Five days before it was to deliver a verdict on the case between South Africa’s star athlete Caster Semenya and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) said on Thursday it would postpone its decision until the end of April.

South African 800-metres double Olympic champion Semenya is seeking to overturn a new set of IAAF regulations that are aimed at lowering the testosterone levels of hyperandrogenic athletes.

The IAAF contend that Semenya and other female athletes that are classed as having differences in sexual development (DSDs) gain an unfair advantage due to their higher testosterone levels, but only in races between 400 and 1,000-metres.

READ MORE: How the case between Semenya and IAAF unfolded

Under its new rules, athletes classed as having DSDs must reduce their blood testosterone level to below five (5) nmol/L for a continuous period of six months before they can compete. They must then maintain it below that level continuously.

A wide coalition has rallied behind Semenya’s cause, including the government in her native South Africa and rights activists worldwide.

Some scientific experts have argued that barring Semenya from competition due to naturally high testosterone levels would be like excluding basketball players because they are too tall.

CAS explains delay

CAS have called the hearing “one of the most pivotal CAS cases” that could have a wide reaching consequence not just for the future of athletics, but sport in general.

The body had been expected to announce its decision on March 26, six months prior to the World Championships in Doha.

It said on Thursday that since the Feb. 18-22 hearing, the parties have filed additional submissions and materials. No specific date for the decision has been set.

IAAF reacts to delay

The IAAF said that, given the delay, it would alter the six-month rule for the world championships in Qatar in September and introduce a “special transitional period” so that affected athletes could still compete.

“The IAAF has decided that the delay should not prejudice the affected athletes,” it said in a statement.

It added that, assuming its new regulations were upheld, affected athletes who comply with the new limit from one week after the final CAS decision until the start of the world championships in September would be allowed to take part.

Agencies